Alumni & Campus Stories

Ingenious: When science came home

Beyond the main doors of Bevier Hall, the stairs rise to a landing adorned with a large painting of a larger-than-life woman—Isabel Bevier, for whom the building is named. In 1900, Bevier arrived at...

Ingenious: Indoor air quality

The world had not seen anything like it before. It was the 1920s and transportation planners had decided to build a tunnel directly below the Hudson River, connecting New York City with New Jersey....

Ingenious: Sonic surgery

Some called it “sonic surgery,” but William J. Fry described it as “surgery by sound.” Fry, a UI professor of physics, was one of the first to develop a system using ultrasound for surgical...

Ingenious: Cureton’s cure

Thomas Cureton generated plenty of headlines in the 1950s when he boldly declared that, for many people, middle age begins prematurely at age 26. Without regular exercise, he argued, the body begins to deteriorate...

Ingenious: Fast thinker

There are many stories about how the fabled chemistry professor got his nickname. According to one, which traces back to 1938, he lectured so rapidly—scribbling equations on the blackboard as he went—that students couldn’t...

atom smasher

Ingenious: Atom smasher

When Illinois Physics Professor Donald Kerst invented his revolutionary atom smasher in 1940, he found naming his device to be a project in itself. After a year with no luck, Kerst put out a...