Alumna works with Nilus to reduce food waste

Carolina Chantril, MUP '15, is working with Nilus to reduce food waste.

Carolina Chantril’s, MUP ’15, newest endeavor with Nilus seeks to mitigate food waste and malnourishment in Argentina, where 16 million tons of food are wasted annually. She is focused on developing a technological and collaborative platform designed to rescue and distribute a huge amount of food. Nilus acknowledges that plenty of wasted food (in perfect condition for consumption) is thrown out every year. Rather than throw it away, the company brings it to those who need it the most: social kitchens and shelters.

The initiative takes its name from the Nile River, where the first model of collaborative agriculture was born on a significant scale.

How does Nilus work? A donor notifies the company via an app about the availability of food products. When a social kitchen or shelter requests these products, an alert is sent to private drivers in the area. The drivers then accept the trip and get paid for transporting the food from the donor site to the beneficiary.

This model represents a win-win for all parties. The food is taken away at no cost to the donor, social kitchens and shelters pay a symbolic price for each kilogram of food they receive (on average, 10 times less than if they buy it from a grocery store), and the drivers are paid for the service they provide.

On Sept. 26th, the official contest was as part of the Google Impact Challenge. As part of this contest, Nilus is competing with two other initiatives from Argentina for the public’s vote and hoping to make it to the final in Mexico.

The initiative takes its name from the Nile River, where the first model of collaborative agriculture was born at a significant scale.

How does Nilus work? A donor notifies Nilus via the app about the availability of food products. When a social kitchen or shelter requests these products, an alert is sent to private drivers in the area. The driver then accepts the trip and gets paid for the transportation of the food between the donor site and the beneficiary.

This model represents a win-win situation for all parties. The food is taken away with no cost to the donor, social kitchens and shelters pay a symbolic price for each kilogram of food they receive (in average ten times less than if they buy it to a grocery store), and the drivers are paid for the service they provide.

On September 26th the official contest was launched as part of the Google Impact Challenge in which Nilus is competing among other two initiatives from Argentina for the public’s vote and make it to the final in Mexico.